Thursday, 18 December 2014

Thursday.


Couldn't think of a mystery object, then realised there was a rather good  one about a yard away from me in the kitchen.  So all three photographs are of today's  MYSTERY OBJECT. It is hewn from a solid block of walnut. Quite crudely made, probably with only a knife (and, I should think,  a hand drill to drill the holes in the flat section towards the top. The item is just over six inches tall.


The back view, which does show what a lovely piece of well figured wood was used. Can you tell me please, what service(in your opinion), the item was meant to serve,  when, and where (be specific) it was made. I think some of you will be able to name the generic term for wooden objects of this type, as they are very collectable.  Ann and I bought this object about thirty five years ago at an antique fair just outside Peterborough. It cost us three pounds, and as we both liked it, we decided we could afford to keep it, and have done.

One large (and I hope) helpful hint :- Pinto (where two similar ones are illustrated).

Good night all.

12 comments:

Crowbard said...

My initial thoughts are as vague as your equine clue. It is of the collectible genre frequently referred to as 'treen', but since it is fairly likely to be a bit of tree by the look of it, I don't expect to get any points for that observation.
Again visual inspection would suggest it is a holder for up to ten similar objects. Since same objects must fit into the ten holes, they must be slim and slightly longer than the block in order to enable their extraction.
It might therefor be a spill holder, a splint holder, taper-holder or a sulphur-match holder. From your clue-word 'Pinto' perhaps it is a horse-shoe-nail holder?
But I do not expect it has ever been so used.
Perhaps it's a holder for quills or pencils or drill-bits or knitting-needles or lace-bobbins or crochet-hooks or manicure items or tooth-picks or spaghetti, stuffed worms, cribbage markers, chyrurgical instruments, shamanic pointing bones, skewers, hat-pins, arbalast-quarrels, harpsichord plectra/quills etc., etc.,....

Ha! Got it, its to hold the little rolled up numbered paper slips which the game keeper offered to the gentlemen at the shoot to determine their position in the firing line...
or what I most expect...

It is a treen holder for something else!

Crowbard said...

PS
It's lovely, I can see why you hung onto it.

Rog said...

Another stinker! Like my old copy of John Buchan I'm slightly foxed.

Pure guesswork but could it be something to do with milking cows?
Can't think how.
Otherwise a stand for holding different sized drill bits or even shaving attachments?

Looks old enough to be 18th Century.

Mike and Ann said...

Crowbard's remarks on 'treen' are correct; that is the generic term for domestic articles made of wood (tree-en). Rog's remark on the age of the item is almost certainly right (i.e. 18th century, as is Crowbard's remark that it is a treen holder for something else. No one has tried to guess where it was made. I thought you would welcome the clue, and a vale yourself of it.

The clue regarding Pinto refers to the book on treen, by Edward H. Pinto.

Mike and Ann said...

P.P.S. Just to make the clues almost tooooo obvious, "We'll keep a welcome in the hilsides, we'll keep a welcome in the vale".

Crowbard said...

Yaki dah bhoyo, was it made in Cymru isn't it then, look you?
Mae'n ddrwg gennym Rwy'n rhif un Duffer, erioed wedi clywed am y Awdur yr ydych yn sôn, ac ni ystyriwyd darnau o bren gyda thyllau fel pwnc difrifol ar gyfer ymchwil; ond yr wyf yn awr yn gweld a pharch y gallent fod.
Sorry I'm a number one duffer, never heard of the Author you mention, nor considered holey noggins of wood as a serious subject for research; but I now see and respect that they may be.
I had also forgotten that some spoons of the period tended to have rod-like handles rather than the present spatulate arrangement. I have not found access to the authority at which you hinted but I have found a rectangular treen item with 12 similar holes, 4 on each of 3 'steps' described as a spoon holder. So I'll offer spoon-rack as my submission with no pretensions of being previously aware of their existence.

Crowbard said...

I think Rog deserves a merit, milking cows is a prerequisite to making custard which cannot be readily enjoyed without a spoon. I daresay when it comes to traditional desserts Rog is a willing spoon-holder !

Lori Skoog said...

If I had it, I would put my watercolor brushes in it. I can see that Crowbard takes these challenges very seriously!

Hope you two have a very Merry Christmas and a Healthy and Happy New Year. All the best to Nea and the rest of your family too.

Rog said...

Yes Crowbard, a wizzened antique spoon holder is a reasonable description of myself.

What was the clue about having a pair of them though? The clues are as difficult to follow as the plot of Lewis.

Mike and Ann said...

Hello Lori. I can quite see that the object might be useful as a water colour paintbrush holder.
It is, of course, a kitchen skewer holder. The full and definitive answer will be found on the blog entry for Saturday 20th December, 2014.

Crowbard said...

I believe I mentioned skewers between shamanic pointing bones and hat-pins, I know I was using the 'grape-shot' response to try to hit the right answer but you then suggested my 'something else' hypotheses was correct which must have been quite misleading for your saner and more attentive audience...
Just sour grapes on my part, Mike, you had me trussed up like a turkey....
Speaking of which may I wish you, your family and your worthy readers a very Merry, Joyful and Blessed Christmas-tide.

Mike and Ann said...

Hello Crowbard. Having carefully gone through your original comment, I now find that you did, in fact mention skewers among the other eighteen possible items. I think, in fairness therfore I must award you 90% of the points available; and Roger would get at least 5% for describing this 'mystery item' so accurately as 'another stinker'. The remaining 5% (if I've done my sums correctly - and there must be a first time for everything) must be awarded to Lori Skoog for the rather nice suggestion that it would be a good receptacle for her paint brushes. Well done all of you.