Tuesday, 5 May 2015

Tuesday.


Earlier this week (Monday possibly) we got mildly lost across towards Sudbury. Been through this village before, but I can't remember taking a photo of this building. The main (cream coloured) part  is of various periods, mainly eighteenth century in view, which knowing our area probably means the skeleton of the house, especially if it's end on to the road, is timber framed and probably medieval; But why anyone should, probably during the late eighteenth/early 19th century, build an oast house and nail it on to the lovely earlier building, I really don't know. Suggestions (I want to say sensible ones please, but, on the other hand, I don't want to exclude Rog or Crowbard) would be welcome.


Snapped another church I don't remember seeing before, and I can't remember the name of the village; just sailed round a corner, and there it was. Snapped it through the nearside window, and got a reasonable picture for once. If I ever come across it again, I'll try and get more details of it.

 Been passing busy today, getting ready for Long Melford tomorrow; so I'm now quite ready for bed....

                                       Goodnight All.

7 comments:

Lori Skoog said...

If I lived over there, I would not be able to resist taking pictures of the beautiful architecture.

Crowbard said...

I take it the oast house extends away from the road to a total of about thrice the part shown in your photo to enable the dried hops to be raked out of the drying deck above the kiln into the sacking chute. One can only suppose the house owner was pushed for land or funds to build his new oast house elsewhere; or perhaps he intended to benefit from the warmth from the kiln also heating his house?

Crowbard said...

Could that be Lawshall church Mike? It looks very similar to my mind.

Mike and Ann said...

Hello Lori. No, I can never resist taking photoes of early (or just beautiful) buildings, either. Nice to hear from you. Regards to you both, Mike.

Mike and Ann said...

Hell Crowbard. It is rather tempting to imagine the owner of that house, somewhere about 1780ish, being a bit hard up and deciding to do his own brewing, and I like your idea that the warmth of the oast house might be used to add some warmth to the manor house. We both know how cold eleven foot ceilings can make a Georgian Manor House (id est Welney House) and how welcome a bit of auxhiliary central heating might have been. Good thinking, brother.

Mike and Ann said...

Just been looking up All Saints' Parish Church, Lawshall; and it looks very like the one in the photo. Also, having checked a map, Lawshall appears to be spot on in the right place. Next time we go that way (probably to shop, we must go and have a real look at it. It looks promising. Thanks.

Crowbard said...

Fascinating histories you have in Suffolk Mike. Particularly for creatively inconsistent spelling of Lawshall.
The village was originally known as "Hlaw-gesella" which meant the shelter or hut on a hill or high ground. Early records indicate that in later years the name was recorded as "Laushella" (972), "Lawesselam" (1086), "Laveshel" (1095), "Laweshell" (1194) and "Laugesale" (1253). Other names identified in the County of Suffolk records include Lausel, Lausele, Lausell, Lauselle, Laushalle, Laushill, Laushille, Laushull, Laushulle, Lausill, Lawcell, Laweshill, Laweshille, Lawishille, Lawsall, Lawschyll, Lawsele and Lawsell.
Is this some kind of record?
Speaking of records:-
Lawshall was recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086. The entry for the parish states "St Benedict held Lawshall as a Manor with eight caracutes of land". The parish held the following:-
16 villagers, 10 smallholders, 5 slaves, 3 ploughs in Lordship, 10 men’s ploughs, 10 cattle, 12 goats, 30 pigs, 100 sheep, 1 cob , 8 acres of meadow. Value £12. A church and 30 acres of free land.