Monday, 16 June 2014

Monday.

 Eventful few days this end of Suffolk. The picture above shows the state of our garden (the roses anyway). It also shows, in the top right hand corner, the tip of a ladder, and this is because, our local roofing firm (about a hundred yards up the road from us) have started work on our leaky roof. This started last December, and we have been living, since then with buckets strategically placed whenever it rained. This led, directly to today's miracle. Our neighbour, Christian, the roofer, who is assisted by one of his sons, was giving me a progress report this morning, and I told him about my other problem :- the fact that my computer appears to be dying on its feet. He immediately told me that he might be able to help with this. His younger son, is apparently a whiz with computers.  "I'll send him round to see you this afternoon."   Dylan (hope I've spelled that right) turned up, spent about forty minutes playing with the computer, and reported it to be now in a good state of health (!!!!!!!).   Told you it was a miracle, didn't I?
On Saturday, we motored up to North Suffolk for East  Anglia's Annual Blogmeet,  hosted by Zoe and Russell. It was up to its usual high standards - glorious food, good wine, and excellent company. At the end of lunch, Zoe produced the above floor show - a delightfully well behaved  (well, one minor mistake - which we can put down to his extreme youth), and very sociably inclined young tortoise, photographed above.
Thank you Zoe and Russell - we thoroughly enjoyed our day.

                               ________________________________________

Yesterday, Sunday, we had supper with Sheila, who lives about two hundred yards from us. Supper followed by two good games of scrabble. Sheila told us she hadn't played in years, but played two very good games despite that. Made me exert meself!   Been a  good weekend, followed by GETTING MY COMPUTER PUT RIGHT.  Who could (reasonably) ask for more?

13 comments:

Crowbard said...

That is a photo of a most elegant hand Mike, but is the tortoise not a ceramic confection by the whimsical Mr. Wade?
Such a relief to hear good news on all fronts (if a roof, technically a top, may be included in 'fronts' along with the computer, which was at the frontiers of technology )!

Mike and Ann said...

Dear Crowbard, quite agree with you regarding the hand - should add that it matches the rest of the lady.

However, I cannot approve of your mentioning Wade Whimsies in the same paragraph. Once attended an 'Antique Fair' where there were acres of $%&**£^ Wade Whimsies being shown as 'antiques'. And as I can remember the ghastly things being manufactured, they do not qualify as 'antique' in any sense of the word!

Z said...

A real tortoise I assure you, Crowbard. Quite two inches long - the shell that is - and she weighs an ounce and a quarter.

I trust you also admire the rather lovely tablecloth, made by a lady who was born in 1883.

Crowbard said...

Understood entirely dear chap, seniority is in no way related to antiquity.

Mike and Ann said...

Hello Z. Your baby tortoise is a charming creature. And I loved the fact that her previous owner carefully checked that Russell had grandchildren before parting with her.

Mike and Ann said...

P.s. Yes, we did notice that very elegant table cloth. The sheer amount of work in it was incredible. Did you know the lady who made it?

Crowbard said...

Forgive me Z, my eye was entirely occupied by the elegance of the hand and the counter-point charm of the infant Testudinesian reptile.
There appears to be a high density of fine stitchery in the tablecloth, organized into complex geometries; it is a craft of such complex skills as is beyond my ken.
PS Mike, a roman shielded formation to defend against incoming projectiles.

stigofthedump said...

Welcome back - you've been missed!

Mike and Ann said...

Thank you, Sal.

Mike and Ann said...

Hello Crowbard. Yes, and from downcoming projectiles, when entering a gateway, or town. There's just about enough schoolboy latin left to remember what 'Testudo' means.

Z said...

It's a wonderful cloth, demonstrating ability in embroidery, drawn-thread work, lace-making and - well, I dunno, I can't do it anyway.

Yes, I did know her, for many years. Clarissa Fitt - yes, Miss Fitt is no joke, I'm afraid - lived for 101 and a half years to the day, from 26th June 1883 to 26th December 1984. She was very happy to live to hold my youngest son, as she dearly loved babies, though she had none of her own.

The tots will be inherited one day, though we haven't chosen the victims yet. Not that they're any trouble...Isn't testudo a defensive move by Roman soldiers? I'm confused.

Mike and Ann said...

Hello Z. Yes, of course I've heard you mention Miss Fitt before.
I think, if the tortoises were mine, I might tell all the grandchildren that the best behaved ones would inherit the tortoises. That, I think, would ensure a reasonably quiet life while I was here, although it might be followed by an almighty row when I'd turned me toes up. Still - that would be the least of my worries by then.

Yes, you're quite right about the Roman Testudo. As I understand it the Roman shields could be made to interlock with each other, so the Roman Soldiers could lift the shields above their heads, interlock them, and march along well protected. Looked at from above you could see why this arrangement was given the name testudo - a tortoise.

Pat said...

Wow that is a pretty extensive roof repair. Great to get it done and I'm speechless at your computer good fortune.