Thursday, 28 November 2013

Thursday.


Been a busy week so far. On Tuesday morning we set out quite early and motored to London. Just as well we set out early because there were signs out that on the M25 junctions 24 to 27 were subject to delays. We therefore took the M11 from the M25, drove south to the A406 (the North Circular) and motored round  to Lizzie's on that. Better road than it used to be. Parked car  at Lizzie's, picked up Grandson Matt and he and I  took the tube to South Kensington. Then walked to Knightsbridge, and viewed Bonham's Arms and Armour sale. Later that day returned to Lizzie's where we ate and slept.
          You may remember that I mentioned Granddaughter Georgie's engagement to Andy?  I think I mentioned it probably a couple of months ago. Well anyway, below is a photograph of the betrothed couple.

On Wednesday afternoon, went back to Bonhams auction sale (Arms and Armour), where I bid for a few lots (successfully in three cases) returned to Lizzie's, again ate with them, and eventually arrived home at about ten thirty p.m.
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And finally (at the request of Crowbard) below is a photograph of the previous entry's mystery object in action. Hope this makes its action and purpose clear. It does, in fact, work well and easily, although I'm tempted to tighten the rivet a little.

2 comments:

Maggie said...

What a handsome couple they make, almost looks like a photo from the 40's with the uniform and Georgies hair style!

You didn't say what era the egg topper was from, Victorian? German? Pure guess work on the origins of course.

Love Maggie x

Mike and Ann said...

Hello Maggie. Yes, I had just the same reaction to that hairstyle. I remember my mother (and Aunt Ivy) wearing a very similar style, just at the end of the last war, I suppose. And I seem to remember a photo of Olga with much the same style.

Ref the egg topper, I think it is English, and it dates from around 1880 -mid/late Victorian, anyway. Great people for mechanical gadgetry the Victorians.