Monday, 2 September 2013

Monday.


Moral tale coming up here; at least I think there's a moral in it somewhere.  'If you can meet with triumph or disaster' stuff.  Some time ago Ann spent a lot of time knitting a fairly complicated jumper for herself. When done, she was very pleased with the jumper, which was her size, her colour, and 'hung well' on her.  Then she washed the jumper and (you've probably guessed) - it shrunk-very evenly - it looked like felt rather than a knitted item, though it might have fitted a two year old. Then a friend of ours saw it - Joyce, who is very good indeed with her needle, and indeed at most handicrafts. She asked Ann if she could "take it and see what she could do with it".   Ann handed it over, but wasn't very optimistic about the matter, as she really couldn't see that  anything  could be done to improve matters.   Then, a few days ago, Joyce handed Ann the above and below photographed very stylish handbag and purse, which she'd made from the shrunken jumper.  She'd turned a disaster into a real triumph.   Well done Joyce, and many thanks. It cheered Ann up no end.
P.s. The silvery item on the purse in the top picture is a twenty pence piece, which I've left in the photo to give some idea of size. In fact Joyce put it in the purse because of the old superstition that you never give anyone an empty purse- although I would think Joyce is the least superstitious of women, being a semi retired C.of E. Minister.

17 comments:

Z said...

How clever and it looks really good. What a pity about the jumper though.

Rog said...

So Ann is carrying small arms now?

My Scottish mother used to use the expression "Hanselling" to mean "christening" any cash carrying device with a small coin for luck. I assumed it was a peculiar Scots thing.

(The process of removing a threepeny bit from a Scottish purse was called "using a spanner")

Mike and Ann said...

Hello Z. Yes, it's a very nice item again.

Mike and Ann said...

Hello Rog. That's odd, but it's certainly a custom in the Norfolk fen area, too. I suppose you could say that the average Scotsman and the average Norfolk fenman have similar ideas on generosity.
Ironic ? Me ?

Crowbard said...

We are generous and considerate folk Mike; and our consideration for the sensitivities of others rules our generosity; we would not wish to embarrass anyone by offering them cash or goods lest they suppose we consider them needy folk or unfortunates, or worse, improvident! Then there are those who would suppose we were making a show of our wealth (such as it isn't) or seeking society's approval if we should demonstrate our generosity too well or too frequently. It is a great trial being generous Mike, we are better (better-off) people for our considerateness holding our generous feelings in check.

Mike and Ann said...

Hello Crowbard. I see just what you mean (sorry - don't know how that word -mean- got in)- you intend saying, and I am lost in admiration of our consideration for others.
I don't know why the word Jesuitical is running in my mind. I must look it up and see what it means.

Crowbard said...

Mea Culpa! Mean maxima culpa!

Maggie said...

Well you see, you are all wrong because Mum always said you should put silver in a new purse which is being given as a gift, and she was born in Leicestershire.
Having said that, thinking about it, Grandma was from Newcastle, so it may be a Northern tradition (or East Coast).
I was really shocked to find out today that the tooth fairy now leaves a whole pound for a tooth these days, what is the world coming to!

PixieMum said...

The custom of handing over a silver coin with a purse or wallet was known by my mother, her background is London, Surrey and a little Devon so maybe it is a countrywide custom.

Crowbard said...

Oh dear, Maggie! A gold sovereign has about the same value as a dentist charges for an NHS check-up. I'm too long in the tooth and short in the sporran to contemplate the tooth-fairy's pension fund! - which must be pitifully low at a brass pound per tooth - I suppose we'll soon be reading of bunches of tooth-fairies going around kicking folk's teeth out just to eke out a living!
~(;¬o}>

Mike and Ann said...

Hello Maggie, that does seem to widen the area for this custom, but, in view of Pixie Mum's evidence, I think she is probably right that it is a nationwide custom. As I remember it, the Norfolk fen version was that if you gave someone an empty purse as a present, it would be empty more often than not; but that if you gave them a purse with a coin in it, they would never be flat broke.

Lori Skoog said...

So clever!

Crowbard said...

Hi Mike,
Jude says "How are you off for sloes this year?" We seem to have plenty of a decent size locally if you need any and they are ripe enough now.
Love to you both,
Carl'n'Jude

Mike and Ann said...

Hi Carl and Jude. The truthful answer is 'not very well, really'. We've been on a sloe hunt, and the only ones we can see are way out of reach and only just ready. I think a good many people have been picking them before they are really ripe, which is a bit annoying. If you really have spares, please could we have some. I will, of course reimburse you the postage. Many thanks.

Crowbard said...

Even around here where the blackthorn are plentiful and fruit-laden, folk seem clueless as to when to pick'em; they take 'em when they're tiny and hard as bullets; but there are still oodles left to pick. This is a subtle and sneaky way of fathoming out your recipe -oops, nearly gave the game away there, please ignore foregoing as the gentleman you are... Changing the subject, how many bottles do you wish to lay down and how many pounds should we send you, please? Forget the postage, put it towards a decent tip for your new Porter-in-Chief next door, I value his efforts to ease your burden.

Crowbard said...

Hi Mike, Jude has jumped the gun a bit and sent you off a box of 2 to 3 Lbs. of sloes. There is no shortage here and we can send as many more as you require,
Luv & stuff
C&J

Mike and Ann said...

Hello Crowbard and Jude. Thank you very much. I usually make my yearly ration from about five pounds of sloes; so, if you're really sure it's no trouble I'd be very grateful for another couple of pounds or so.
Many thanks to you both, Mike.