Thursday, 16 October 2014

Thursday.


Here are two photographs of yesterday's Mystery Item, now complete. The top one illustrates best what I meant when I said that you should be able to work out one more fact from today's illustration of the clock complete.  I think it is very obvious from the top picture.  The lower picture makes it equally obvious where the clock was made, and shows that it is weight driven, and the THREE weights indicate that it is hour and quarter striking. Not sure that I'm making this clear, but have another crack at it.


5 comments:

Crowbard said...

I see it has a pendulum escapement, which was expected, although the previous picture obscured the pendulum's stem in the shadow of a chain. The matching brass hands, the dial and its frame are simple and remarkably elegant suggesting the clock was made in the early 1800s? Now please tell me what I should have noticed.

Mike and Ann said...

Hi Crowbard. Anchor escapement. Your remarks regarding the 'simple and remarkably elegant' appearance of the clock are very apt, and point to what I was trying to get at. It has all the appearance of an English wall clock (a school house clock), and this is because the maker was building a clock very much with the English market in mind. With the exception of the wights and pendulum this could appear to be an English fusee wall clock of good quality.

Crowbard said...

A very proportionate, handsome and satisfying import, Mike.

Mike and Ann said...

Thank you Carl.

Mike and Ann said...

P.s. Not mine, of course. In for restoration.