Tuesday, 2 September 2014

Tuesday.


This lunchtime we decided to go to our favourite farm shop restaurant to eat, but when we got there it was crowded - not a parking place to be had on the car park - recently enlarged, and the restaurant was crowded anyway, we think because it's the last few days of the school holidays, so we motored on to Lindsey, a nearby village. There used to be two pubs there, the Red Rose (above) and the White Rose, which is now a private house. Although it was now nearly one o'clock the pub was very quiet (only one other customer when we went in). The barmaid said that she could serve us food, so we ordered, collected a drink and went and sat down in a window seat. We'd both ordered gammon, and greens, with a poached egg and chips, and when it arrived it was excellent.  After lunch we decided that we'd not looked at Milden Church for some years, so went to find it. It's only a mile or so from Lindsey, but we got ourselves rather lost in the  lanes.


This was no real problem because we were able to take the next few photos of Suffolk houses from the car windows.



Above is the Church we were looking for, and it was well worth the search. It is tiny, but feels bigger inside than looks possible from the outside.


Various interesting contents inside the church, mainly still in use. We both quite liked the look of this old chap/gentleman.
Got home about four p.m.  since when I've been pottering in the workshop and generally getting ready for the  Long Melford Antique Fair, which takes place tomorrow, and means a very early start,  So -
   
                                      Goodnight All.

8 comments:

Crowbard said...

I believe the Church at Milden is St. Peter's. The carved effigy of the old chap/Gentleman is of James Alington who died unmarried on 7 September 1626. It was erected around 1627 (despite the earlier fashion of his clothes). I'm not sure why there is a book beneath his head, perhaps he was a writer or poet? He was descended from the Barons Alington of Horseheath who lived at Bottisham Hall, Cambs.
The penultimate Alington (4th baron, 2nd creation), William Alington (1610-1648) married a distant relative of ours, Elizabeth Tollemache daughter of Sir Lionel Tollemache, Bt. of Helmingham Hall, Suffolk.

Crowbard said...

I believe the Church at Milden is St. Peter's. The carved effigy of the old chap/Gentleman is of James Alington who died unmarried on 7 September 1626. It was erected around 1627 (despite the earlier fashion of his clothes). I'm not sure why there is a book beneath his head, perhaps he was a writer or poet? He was descended from the Barons Alington of Horseheath who lived at Bottisham Hall, Cambs.
The penultimate Alington (4th baron, 2nd creation), William Alington (1610-1648) married a distant relative of ours, Elizabeth Tollemache daughter of Sir Lionel Tollemache, Bt. of Helmingham Hall, Suffolk.

Crowbard said...

PS just checked Burke it seems there was only one creation of the Barons Alington (sometime between 1618 & 1648) so scrub the 2nd creation from his title.

Crowbard said...

James' brother Giles married Margaret Spencer of Althorp, Lincs.
See further details on the Horner Family-g tree.

Lori Skoog said...

I sure do appreciate the architecture over there! So different from what we have. Thanks for taking us along.

Mike and Ann said...

Hello Carl. Thanks for all the fascinating information on distant connexion Alington. He looks, or rather his effigy does, rather a sporting old lad.

Mike and Ann said...

Hi Lori - always a pleasure.

Pat said...

What a strange decorative roof the church has.