Sunday, 28 July 2013

Sunday.


Spent this morning straining and bottling last year's sloe gin. Bit of a thin year for sloes last year, so only ten and a half (half bottles) if you see what I mean, but it's quite good stuff. Should be drinkable by Christmas.......... WHOA Horner! It's drinkable now (been doing a quality control test): I mean - should be even better by Christmas.  I don't seem able to build up a supply of the stuff these days - only three bottles of the 2011 left.

The photo is of a decanter of sloe gin and glasses ready on the sideboard.  In case of visitors that is.

Must now nip up and make meself respectable for Church.
More later perhaps.


13 comments:

Crowbard said...

Well, Well! Mike. Great Horners think alike; I just decanted, filtered and bottled 3 litres of the gorgeous brew yesterday afternoon.
Don't touch it m'self - doctor's orders - but you have to lick the vats and dippers out to maintain the traditional approach. And it is only polite to offer Jude a sip of the nectar and politely keep her company whilst she imbibes...
Sho Chizz-Ho bruvva, thatsh'Anuvva nail in the cough-drop or shummat likshe zhatt,
bibble-bibble-vinbibulositously

Mike and Ann said...

Or, as Sakespear shed (see, I got that one write)- 'scribble, quibble, foil, and so one,
How these poetic johnnies go on.'

Any way, all the very.........

And, as my late, and much lamented Mother in law once said "Men!They NEVER grow up. It's their main charm".

Maggie said...

I tend to make Sloe Vodka rather than gin, for some reason gin doesn't agree with me. Last year I made blackberry vodka and elderberry vodka. I won't use the blackberries this year, although the drink was nice, I prefer the blackberries in a pie with apples, or indeed to make jam with. I have the last few years made rosehip syrup which is lovely on pancakes or ice cream and very soothing for sore throats.

Mike and Ann said...

I totally agree with you re blackberries, Mag. They're proper place is in a pie with apples. And I didn't know that elderberries are much good for anything. Among many other things I didn't know was that you are such an accomplished cook.
How do two siblings reach our present vintage (mine anyway) knowing so little of each other's skills (ref your remarks on my silver smithing skills last week)?On second thoughts, NO, don't answer that. Not on open blog anyway. Perhaps next time we get together.
Love, Mike.

Mike and Ann said...

Sorry. Never thought I'd do that :-
They're
there
their.
I do know the difference.
In this case should have been their-their- their. Must be getting tired.

Sir Bruin said...

We have had a go at raspberry gin. Not sure how it will turn out. We might need to pick your brains if we are going to get into this in a bigger way. A good single malt takes a lot of beating though.

Mike and Ann said...

Hello Sir B. Not tried raspberry gin, but I'm sure my recipe for sloe gin could be adapted. Generally speaking though - taste as you go along and adjust as necessary.
Quite agree regarding a good single malt.Can't be beaten; and anyway, it doesn't do to make comparisons.

Maggie said...

I have always loved cooking, you may remember I was deputy head cook at Woburn golf and country club for a few years. My roast dinners are legendary, ask Crowbard! I even make my own pork pie at Christmas.
Grandma used to make wonderful wine from elderberries, it used to taste like vintage port. The elderberry vodka was a bit of a strong taste mind.
With regard to the single malt, I prefer Irish whisky (Jamesons or Bushmills), it is triple distilled and very smooth.

Mike and Ann said...

Sorry Maggie. I had forgotten that, if I ever knew it.
If you are talking of your Grandma Smith, her potato wine and her wheat wine were incredibly strong. Tried them as a teenage boy and then had to concentrate hard on remaining vertical and mobile.
I can't remember her elderflower wine (which probably means I never tried it), but I have tried elderberry wine as a youngster in the fens, and yes, it was usually good. I've also tried elderflower wine, and at its best it's comparable to a decent Mosel.

Mike and Ann said...

Sorry, meant your Grandma Smith's elderberry wine.

Crowbard said...

Hic Mike, or possibly Hi,
Have you any idea how long the after-effects of bottling sloe-gin last? Quite pleasant but a bit confusing.
I'm turning from Crowbard to Bar-crowd!

Crowbard said...

PS. your mother-in-law was a Lady, and that always brings out the best in men, which is possibly why she found any charm in blokes at all.

Mike and Ann said...

Thank you Crowbard. She was, in every sense, a gentlewoman; and she always found the best she could in everyone.