Tuesday, 9 October 2018

Tuesday



Mystery Object. Usual Rules.


P.s. Tee Hee.

8 comments:

paul cully said...

As I said before, scale is all important. I know exactly what this is but without the scale I cannot say which Planet it originated from. Nanoo, nanoo.

Mike. said...

Hello Paul. I should have put a foot ruler in the picture. I'm having no truck with that millimeter business of course. I've just run up the undercroft stairs and measured it. It is one foot five inches overall. Having puffed my way back down to the cellar, I'm lost in admiration at the things I do for my readers/friends. Warm regards, Mike.

Crowbard said...

Lovely old treen objects Mike, an overhead view of a candle-stick, in a porringer, in a serving dish, probably Scandinavian is my guess; although the bowls may have served many other purposes. When someone else has found the right answer please tell us about the different timbers, dates and origins of these items.

Mike. said...

Hello Crowbard. Yours is the closest answer yet. Your first sentence is the most relevant. I took another photograph from a slightly different angle. When I can find it and display it, all will be revealed.

Rog said...

Base of a candlestick taken from underneath.

Mike. said...

Sorry Rog. Nowhere near.

Mike. said...

Afraid I cannot get this machine to accept photographs, so you'll have to put up with written descriptions, I'm afraid. The answer is that the photograph was taken looking down into a pile of wooden (treen) bowls, largest at the bottom of the pile. The largest is one foot, five inches at its widest, the next one up is one foot , 1 inch. The middle one is nine and a half inches. The next one is five and a half inches; and the top one is two and a half inches. They were all found in Sweden over the years, and all are, I think, made from burrs cut from silver birch trees. The middle one is cut with a handle to one end, and I'm told that this one was made by the Lappish (or Sami) people, to milk reindeer into. Three of them are carved with initials and dates on the bases, all of which I believe to be original and accurate. The biggest one is dated 1670, the middle (Sami) one is dated 1729, and the smallest one is dated 1791. The smallest one is not, I'm told by Swedish experts, a tiny child's bowl, as is generally assumed, but for elderly folk to drink their schnapps from !! They are all of lovely, subtle colours and grain. I hope this helps, but if anyone (especially Crowbard) has further questions, please ask, and I'll try and answer them

Crowbard said...

"Tee Hee!" indeed Mike, that is a very clever arrangement of delightful goodies. The similarity of colour of the upper three items and the handle of the milking dish fooled me into seeing them as one item of some height (such as a candlestick). Should the smallest bowl ever be duly filled with the appropriate liquor, I would be delighted to test its efficacity as a tippling device.