Saturday, 21 July 2018

Saturday.


I've  been working on the crossbow which I bought in Sotheby's  a week or  so  ago, and find that the maker's name is  inlaid in the top of the  stock in  silver (I think). The letter form in which it is done makes me think that the item is probably rather earlier than I'd thought (possibly seventeenth century          rather  than 18th). I've done most of the necessary mechanical work, but there's a good deal of --

for  want of a better word -- cosmetic work ....
.to be done  yet

5 comments:

Crowbard said...

A handsome piece of work Mike.

paul cully said...

So you can just wander into any crossbow retailer and wander out again armed with a lethal weapon of unimaginable stopping power. My god the N.R.A and Sir Donald salute you !! That's what the second amendment is all about.

Mike said...

Thankyou, Crowbard.

Mike said...

Hello Paul. Nice to hear from you. The law for crossbows is the same here as for guns:-
If they are bona fide antique guns, kept for ornament or curiosity, they are exempt from any form of certification. The problem lies in the 'bona fide antique' bit. However, I have been registered as an expert witness regarding the age of weapons since the mid 1960s. As the item in question was purchased from a major auction room, I think that several members of the firm (ex Sotheby's) are similarly registered. therefore - No Problem.

Mike said...

Dear Paul. Been thinking about your question; and perhaps you don't realise what a very civilised country this is ??????